Postcards from the Future

Touring around California you could be forgiven for thinking you’re living in the future, and not just because of the Silicon Valley wizardry that surrounds us all. We also have to thank Hollywood’s movie magic, which has turned the state into a backdrop for countless science fiction films presenting futures both terrible and wondrous. It’s not just that so many are filmed here—writers and filmmakers have been exploring the future through California sets for decades.

Last Night on Earth

An excerpt from the piece I'm working on, along with some images from the first night I landed in LA. It was really too appropriate, considering I've got sci-fi dystopia and apocalypse on the brain. "Every American city boasts an official insignia and slogan. Some have municipal mascots, colors, songs, birds, trees, even rocks. But Los Angeles alone has adopted an official nightmare." - Mike Davis, City of Quartz

Media: Hollywood Needs Women

In one of my Film & Digital Media seminars this spring, a classmate had us do an exercise: She showed us a series of photos of well-known female directors, such as Lynne Ramsay and Sally Potter—women whose movies a group of film students would likely have seen and admired, some of whose work I count among my favorites. With the exceptions of Jane Campion and Kathryn Bigelow, most of us weren't able to identify a single one by sight. And if we couldn't, who could?

On The Road [while Female]

Only once I started traveling on my own, at 18, did I understand that, as Vanessa Veselka says "a man on the road is solitary. A woman on the road is alone. This is not cute wordplay, but a radically different social experience." The mild suspicion of everyone from strangers on trains, to hostel staff, to groups of fellow travelers was first surprising, then irksome, and then wearily anticipated. While I'm sure that, on average, single men meet with far more suspicion than single women, it was made quite clear to me that in this context men were seen as being adventurous, while I was a cause for concern—"a dangerous blank."

Mary Mattingly’s Flock House

Mary Mattingly’s Flock House, as it will look when installed on top of the MEX building. From the New York Times blog "The Local." New York is a crowded city, both in terms of the number of people who live here, and in its physical footprint. Our apartment towers and skyscrapers press against the water … Continue reading Mary Mattingly’s Flock House

Rooftop Farms, Brooklyn

A piece I wrote for One-Earth.com. Greenpoint, Brooklyn earned its name from the rich, river-front land that made it a natural site for colonial-era farms. Of course, that same location made it a perfect location for heavy industry and these days the name seems like more of a joke as the area is better known … Continue reading Rooftop Farms, Brooklyn

Grub

A piece I wrote for One-Earth.com. The Rubulad space in South Williamsburg might be better known for its raucous all-night extravaganzas, but two Sunday evenings a month, a more low-key, though no less open-minded gathering takes over. Run by folks from a variety of local groups such as the Toyshop collective, Time's Up and the … Continue reading Grub

Four-Course Vegan

A piece I published on One-Earth.com. Private dining clubs, typically held in the chef's lofts or apartments, have been in vogue in New York for the past few years as a way to create a more intimate dining experience, where the only steps between the raw ingredients and your plate are the chefs preparing and … Continue reading Four-Course Vegan